How to Get a Loved One into Drug Rehab?

Watching a loved one struggle with addiction can be heartbreaking. Their choices may seem dangerous, their lifestyle unmanageable. The thing to remember is this; every addict is fighting a very real battle for their life. Very often they have tried to beat their addiction only to find themselves using again. Are they just weak willed? Don’t they care about their health? Their relationships? Don’t they want to get better?

Getting a loved one into drug rehabilitation requires patience, understanding and perseverance. Every addict’s struggle is unique, but there are ways to help you better assist them in their recovery.

3 Things to Understand About Addiction

  • Addiction is powerful. Overcoming addiction is not a matter of will power; in fact, addicts may feel powerless over the urge to use drugs. The chemical changes that take place in an addict’s brain affect their thoughts and actions and long term substance abuse creates a chronic urge to use that is nearly impossible to resist without help.
  • Relapse is Common. Studies show that most addicts relapse at least once, if not several times, before finding their way to recovery. Recovery from addiction requires long-term work to manage cravings. Sobriety is not just a matter of stopping substance abuse; it requires that the addict learn how to overcome old patterns and behaviors associated with their life as an addict.
  • Addiction can be treated. While there is no “cure all” for addiction, recovery is possible with the right tools. It is important to remember that an addict is not simply fighting a physical and mental urge to abuse drugs. They are also struggling to adopt new ways of facing life’s challenges. This is extremely difficult for someone new to recovery and requires a holistic approach to healing that looks at root cause of what led them to substance abuse in the first place.

Understanding addiction is just the first step.  The road to recovery is long and difficult, but helping your loved one receive the treatment they need to find sobriety can save their life. There are a few important things to remember when you are figuring out how to get a loved one into drug rehab:

The Do’s and Don’ts of Getting Your Loved One Into Rehab

Do be positive and constructive. Criticism and judgement may make your loved one feel defensive and resist help. If you approach them with genuine concern for their well-being instead of from a place of resentment for past hurts, they will be more receptive to receiving professional help.

Don’t blame yourself. Even if you feel like you have enabled your loved one’s addiction in the past, blaming yourself will only hinder your efforts to help.   Your loved one’s recovery is a chance at a fresh start, so don’t hold onto resentment.

Do stage an intervention. This is an opportunity for friends and family to express their concerns and talk about how their loved one’s addiction directly impacts their lives. It is important to remember that an addict is not a bad person but they do require professional help to recover.

Despite your best efforts, your loved one might refuse to admit that they have a problem that requires professional help. What can you do if your loved one refuses treatment?

  • Remember that drug abuse makes it nearly impossible for an addict to make rational choices about their addiction and recovery
  • Reach out to others who understand what you are going through. This may be a professional counselor or support groups like Nar-Anon.
  • Don’t give up. Your loved one is facing a difficult journey. Knowing you are behind them, forgiving their past choices and supporting their efforts to recover, may be what helps them find the strength to get help.

If you believe your loved one is struggling with addiction, there are people who can help you. The specialists at Luxury Beach Rehab are your best resource for understanding what your love one is going through.

If you or a loved one is in need of professional assistance, don't hesitate to consult with our team of licensed and experienced counselors, 24/7: (855) 396-5909 We're here for you.